Source Themes

Racial Housing Discrimination and Flood Risk

Persons of color are more likely to live in and move into high flood risk areas. African American and Hispanic individuals also tend to pay significantly more than whites for equivalent housing and there is significant spatial heterogeneity in these …

Does Flood Insurance Help Neighborhoods Recover from Flooding?

This study investigates the impact of flood insurance on neighborhood recovery following flooding events. Utilizing a shift-share instrumental variable approach, we assess the influence of flood insurance claims on housing prices in the aftermath of …

Social learning about climate risk

With a social network adjacency matrix constructed from the Facebook Social Connectedness Index (SCI), this paper examines whether social learning facilitates climate risk perception updates to inform climate adaptation. We find that Hurricanes …

Unveiling Dynamics in Climate Disaster Information Transmission Across Regions: A Variance Decomposition Network Approach

Modeling the dynamic transmission of climate disaster information during these events is vital for effective disaster preparation, response, and recovery. This study uses Hurricane Ida as a case study and Twitter (currently branded as X) as a social …

Racial Housing Price Differentials in the U.S. Housing Market

We report evidence from the largest study of racial price differentials in the U.S. housing market, constructing a panel of 40 million repeat-sales transactions. We find that price premiums facing Black and Hispanic homebuyers are ubiquitous and …

Demand for annuities: Price sensitivity, risk perceptions, and knowledge

The demand for voluntary individual lifetime annuities is low, as merely 10% of soon-to-be retired Canadians care to buy such contracts. To assess the reasons why, we design a stated-preference experiment in which we vary characteristics of annuity …